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Posts tagged as “protests”

On Last Day Of BreonnaCon, Protesters Look For ‘Good Trouble’

The final day of “BreonnaCon” culminated in the arrests of 64 protesters calling for justice for Breonna Taylor during a sit-in on an overpass near Churchill Downs on Tuesday. 

The national civil rights group Until Freedom organized the day’s action and the events leading up to it to raise awareness about Taylor’s death. Louisville Metro Police Department officers shot and killed Taylor, a 26-year-old emergency room technician, in March while serving a “no-knock warrant.” 

Protest organizers hinted they would march on LMPD’s training academy in South Louisville ahead of Tuesday’s march, but changed course mid-protest and marched to Churchill Downs before continuing on to an overpass across from Cardinal Stadium.

On the bridge, protest organizers announced they would make their stand and asked anyone who did not want to be arrested to leave.

LMPD surrounded those who participated in the sit-in and took protesters away one by one as onlookers cheered and chanted.

Interim Chief Robert Schroeder said later during a news conference they charged protesters with obstructing the roadway and disorderly conduct.  

Until Freedom protesters arrested on a bridge in Louisville Kentucky on August 25, 2020.

In an interview ahead of the act of civil disobedience, Until Freedom Co-founder …

Metro Council Narrowly Rejects Buffer Zones For Health Care Facilities

Metro Council Democrats failed to reach a compromise to pass an ordinance giving health care facilities the option to create a “buffer zone” near their entrances.

Advocates have pushed for such a zone around the EMW Women’s Surgical Center on Market St. for years. Outgoing councilman Brandon Coan (D-8) led the charge on this ordinance, which would apply to other health care facilities as well. He pinned its timing to the COVID-19 crisis.

“This is an ordinance about public safety and public health, people have the right to safe and dignified access to legal health care services,” he said, adding that it was not about debating the ethics of abortion.

He said protesters approaching potentially medically fragile patrons could create a dangerous situation by increasing the risk of transmitting the disease.

But some council members argued that other protesters in Louisville, who have been gathering and marching since late May, were not being regulated this way.

Councilwoman Cindi Fowler (D-14) said Louisville’s chief health strategist, Sarah Moyer, had told committee members a 12-foot-wide buffer zone was needed to maintain social distancing. Prior to that, council members were told racial justice protesters were not increasing the spread of the coronavirus because …

Meet The Teen Leading This Kentucky Town’s Discussion Of Racism In Appalachia

The courtroom was silent as 19-year-old Dayjha Hogg approached the lectern at a Letcher County fiscal court meeting, stared down a panel of county magistrates, and spoke. 

“I know COVID’s going around right now, so just imagine, there’s no COVID, normal society, and imagine you walk around and it’s like you have the plague.”

Hogg is biracial, and her entire county leadership is White. The Berea College student gripped the lectern to steady herself, and continued. 

“People look at you and it’s almost as if, if they stare too long, if they breathe the same air, they’re scared that they’re going to catch the plague. That is just a small, small glimpse of what it was like growing up here in eastern Kentucky as a minority.”

Conversations about police brutality and racial equity are happening across the nation, and rural communities are no exception. 

In Letcher County and Whitesburg, its county seat, a racial reckoning is unfolding that is at once peculiar to this rural Appalachian community and inextricably tied to the one unfolding across the nation. 

This reckoning came after a peaceful Black Lives Matter protest in Whitesburg. 

Hogg helped organize the protest, and she had been a little …

This Week In Conversation: The Pandemic And Kentucky’s Primary Election

Kentucky’s primary election is Tuesday, June 23rd, and the coronavirus pandemic is changing the way most Kentuckians cast their ballots.

The primary was postponed from May to prevent the spread of COVID-19, and for the first time, Kentuckians are being allowed to vote by mail, or vote in person early without providing an excuse.

Most Kentucky counties will have only one voting location, but a federal lawsuit has been filed seeking to add balloting sites in the state’s most populous counties.

This week on In Conversation, we talk about the upcoming election and the balloting process with Kentucky Secretary of State Michael Adams. Kentucky Public Radio Capitol Reporter Ryland Barton gives a preview of the primary races.

Plus, we have the latest on the demonstrations for racial justice that are entering their fourth week in many cities. Friday is Juneteenth, and we hear some citizens’ thoughts on the day commemorating the end of slavery in the U.S.

Listen to this week’s show:

https://dts.podtrac.com/redirect.mp3/chtbl.com/track/G3791/lpm-od.streamguys1.com/inconversation/20200619122335-IC0619_Weird_Election.mp3

https://wfpl.org/this-week-in-conversation-the-pandemic-and-kentuckys-primary-election/ …

Use Of Pepper Balls Resumes At Downtown Louisville Protests

After two weeks where Louisville Metro Police largely ditched the riot gear and stood watch over protests, the tone changed Monday evening and officers resumed firing pepper balls to disperse crowds.

Police declared an unlawful assembly shortly after 7 p.m. on Ninth Street, where a group of protesters was blocking the roadway. The actions came shortly after demonstrators blocked an entrance to Interstate 64, and after a news crew from WLKY shared video of a man throwing a brick through the windshield of the news vehicle.

Our crew just got attacked as we were trying to leave. We’re okay and I recorded the entire thing. I can tell you things are definitely not peaceful in the downtown area today @WLKY #Louisvilleprotests #DavidMcAtee #BreonnaTaylor pic.twitter.com/nnlv0lX34k

— Shaquille Lord (@ShaqWLKY) June 15, 2020

Police warned media and others to stay out of the area.

WARNING:

Due to aggressive behavior of demonstrators downtown, including road blocks, trapping vehicles, and violent behavior, please stay out of the area!

— LMPD (@LMPD) June 15, 2020

A live feed from the protest showed a line of roughly 50 LMPD officers advancing on a group of protesters, and an officer shoved and detained a woman before they …

Family, Friends Mourn David McAtee At Wake

89.3 WFPL News Louisville · Family, Friends Mourn David McAtee At WakeFamily, friends and acquaintances lined the sidewalk outside St. Stephen Church Friday afternoon to pay their respects to David “Yaya” McAtee. McAtee was a Black barbecue chef who was shot and killed by a member of the National Guard last week as authorities tried to enforce a curfew during protests over racism and police brutality.

At the door of St. Stephen Church, people were let in one-by-one to pay their respects, after having their temperature checked to screen for the coronavirus. In line was Calvin Brown, who used to visit McAtee’s shop, Yaya’s BBQ. He said McAtee was a role model for people in this West End neighborhood, where many residents grapple with poverty.

“Even if you had a record, you could still look at David McAtee and say ‘I could do what you doing,’” Brown said.

Brown said McAtee made a business, and a neighborhood institution, out of very little.

“It was a barbecue grill, a bag of charcoal and some meat. And people supported him and felt the love that he shared,” he said.

McAtee was known for giving free food to the homeless, as well …

Protesters Say ‘Breonna’s Law’ Is Only A First Step Toward Justice

Hundreds of protesters chanted “Black Lives Matter” outside the Louisville Metro Police Department Headquarters in downtown on Friday.

The protests continued as Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer signed into law a ban on no-knock warrants and after Gov. Andy Beshear announced a statue of Jefferson Davis will be removed from the Capitol Rotunda.

University of Louisville student and youth organizer David Echeverria said he and other demonstrators are celebrating the passage of the ordinance banning no-knock warrants, but do not believe officials have done enough to grant justice for Breonna Taylor or stymie racial injustice in the Louisville Metro Police Department.

Echeverria said protesters would like to see the officers involved in Taylor’s death fired and prosecuted, and the Louisville police defunded with the money going to impoverished communities of color.

“So we are just demanding that police officers are fired, arrested and charged in Breonna Taylor’s case and that the police department is defunded with the upcoming budget being proposed,” Echeverria said.

Protesters chant Black Lives Matter in front of @LMPD headquarters in Louisville. pic.twitter.com/U6jxacTnig

— Ryan Van Velzer (@RyanVanVelzer) June 12, 2020


Protesters with Black Lives Matter Louisville began the demonstration at 2 p.m. at the Great Lawn of …

After Covington Catholic Videos, Bevin Calls For ‘Less Digital Vitriol’

Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin said he hoped to avoid weighing in on the confrontation between students at Covington Catholic High School and activists in Washington D.C, but took to Twitter on Tuesday to criticize “liberals” who were upset by the controversy.

Over the weekend, a video surfaced showing a group of Covington Catholic students in “Make America Great Again” hats jeering, chanting and laughing at Native American activist Nathan Phillips, who calmly beat a drum and sang a prayer.

Videos released later showed that another group — the Black Hebrew Israelites — had hurled insults at the students before Phillips is seen walking toward them.

After remaining silent on the incident over the weekend, Bevin posted a series of tweets that criticized “liberals” who decried the students’ actions.

“It was amazing how quick those who preach tolerance and non-judgment of others were to judge and label some high school students based on partial information…There are none more intolerant than liberals who don’t like your options, values, faith beliefs, political stance, etc,” Bevin wrote.

“In a world where we have a wealth of information at our fingertips, we have increasingly little discernment and wisdom… Facts matter…The truth matters…Context matters… A …